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Solar PV and biomass installation for customer in Breage

A 28kW biomass installation in Breage

This renewable energy project was focused upon increasing the energy efficiency of this large, traditional property while reducing the carbon footprint of the home and lowering the annual running costs.

Split into two main phases, GreenGenUK recommended installations of solar PV panels to produce free, green solar energy to the property and a biomass boiler to cater for the heating and hot water demand of the property.

Phase 2 – installation of a 28kW Trianco Greenflame external biomass boiler

The biomass installation is of sufficient capacity to provide both space heating and hot water to the large, traditional property simultaneously.

Biomass boilers replace traditional fossil fuels with more cost-effective, naturally occurring substances, primarily wood chips, pellets or logs. By doing so, biomass boilers are able to generate heat energy far more cheaply in a far more environmentally friendly way than harmful fossil fuel alternatives, like gas and oil. As such, the customer will see significant reductions in their energy bills and carbon footprint which was a primary aim of the project.

System Specification

1 x Trianco Greenflame 28kW WES external biomass boiler
1 x 250l unvented hot water cylinder
1 x 180l manual pellet feed
1 x 300l buffer tank with 100mm of insulation

Estimated System Benefits

In accordance with MCS guidance and expectations of performance, GreenGenUK has calculated that this biomass boiler installation will provide the following benefits to the customer:

– Estimated total annual heat output of 39,313 kilowatt hours.

– First-year savings against existing oil bills of £1039.

– First-year Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) payments of £2150.

Based on these predictions and taking into account for inflation, GreenGenUK estimates this biomass boiler system will pay itself back in 5.65 years.

The Renewable Heat Incentive

Similar to solar energy’s Feed-in Tariff, the Renewable Heat Incentive, commonly referred to as the RHI, is a financial incentive scheme that was initiated to bridge the gap between the cost of installing traditional heating technologies and the cost of installing a renewable alternative.

The RHI pays members of the scheme at a set rate for every kilowatt of renewable heat energy generated by their system. Both domestic and commercial customers switching to a renewable heating solution are eligible for RHI payments and payments themselves are dependent on the heat loss, heat demand and energy efficiency of the property. Payments are made quarterly over a period of seven years.

The combination of RHI payments and energy savings made against traditional heating systems mean that renewable heating solutions often repay themselves within the seven year RHI period.

For more information…

For more information on biomass boilers, the Renewable Heat Incentive or any of GreenGenUK’s other renewable heating alternatives, enquire through one of the methods found below.

Phone us in the office on 0800 093 3299 and speak directly to one of our renewable energy engineers

or

Fill out the enquiry form found at the bottom of this page and have one of the GreenGenUK team answer your queries in your preferred timeslot and method of communication.

To book your free survey or for further information call us

Call us 0800 093 3299 Email us

Get a quote

Give us a call or send us a message to arrange your survey and assess the best solutions for your property.

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